Monday, May 02, 2005

Google + MarkNet Print Server = Sanity

There are some days I love Google so much that it hurts. This is one of those days. It all started with a call in my queue about a printer that won't print. No big deal, I think; I'll prove the printer works just fine, as long as no one tries to print from the mainframe. See, I can't fix mainframe print; I just have to make sure the printer is attached to the network and pinging...and it was, just with the wrong IP address. Hrrm. Ok, I'll send it to the server admin who assigns the IP addresses. Wait! This call is back in my queue! Seems DHCP was all in order, and admin dude couldn't get the MarkNet Print Server hard-coded, because someone has put a non-standard password on it. He's miles away, so it's up to me again. The applications support folks would really like their printer working. I try guessing the password; no luck. I'm unhappily considering driving on to the main site to pick up another print server, when I decide to hit Google...and hit Google...and hit Google. The search for some sort of back-door password never bears fruit, but then I turn up this little gem:

To reset the NVRAM on an INTERNAL network card:

1. Print a Network Settings Page:
The Network Settings Page contains detailed information on the current settings for all protocols, as well as the connection status and firmware level. It is thus a record of all current network settings. Print this page for informational purposes before resetting the print server's NVRAM.

1. Press the Menu button repeatedly until Network Menu is displayed on the printer's operator panel.

2. Press Select. You should see Network Option # (where # stands for the number of the slot in which the network card has been installed) or STD Network on the display.

3. Press Select.

4. Press the Menu button until you see Network # Setup or STD Network Setup on the display.

5. Press Select. The word Print should now be displayed.

6. Press Select twice to print the network settings page.

7. Keep this page for your records as it contains information that you may need for reconfiguring your network card.

2. Reset the NVRAM

1. Press the Menu button repeatedly until you see Network Menu on the printer's operator panel.

2. Press Select. You should see Network Option # (where # stands for the number of the slot in which the network card has been installed) or STD Network displayed on the operator panel.

3. Press Select.

4. Press the Menu button until you see Network # Setup or STD Network Setup on the display.

5. Press Select. The word Print should now be displayed.

6. Press and hold the Go button and tap the

button once. You should see SE Menu and General displayed.

  • Release the Go button.
  • Press the Menu button until NVRAM is displayed.
  • Press Select.
  • Press the Menu button until you see Reinit NVRAM on the display.
  • Press Select. The NVRAM on the network adapter is reinitialized so that the settings are returned to the factory defaults. The printer will return to a ready state and all network settings will have to be assigned again.
  • Print another Network Settings page and compare the settings with the original page you printed.
  • Enter the Network Setup menu again to reassign any settings that have been cleared.

To reset the NVRAM on an EXTERNAL network adapter:

1. Print a Network Settings Page:

1. Press the TEST button briefly and then release it. The network settings page will be printed.

2. Keep this page for your records as it contains information that you may need to reconfigure your network card.

2. Reset the NVRAM:

1. Press and hold the TEST button for about 10 seconds and release it when all four LEDs are solid. The LEDs should begin the SE Menu light sequence. This menu consists of a repeating count of binary light patterns.

2. When the LEDs indicate a binary three, press the Menu button to enter the NVRAM menu. A binary three pattern is indicated when the third and fourth LEDs are lit up.

3. When the light indicates a binary two, press the Menu button to reinitialize the NVRAM. A binary two pattern is indicated when the third LED is lit up. The adapter should then return to a ready state, with the LEDs scanning across the adapter from left to right and from right to left. This indicates that the NVRAM on the adapter has been reset and must be configured for your network.

It's the second set of instructions that does it for me. Right away, the little guy picks up his designated IP address, and I successfully send a test print. I notify the server dude and I'm off to the next thing.

Yes, folks, that's another call out of my queue! If Google were a man, I'd hug him!

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