Sunday, February 25, 2007

Comparing/Contrasting HealthCare Pros' Reactions to the UMPC

Whilst reading the feeds, I came across a post about a physician who found his TabletKiosk eo to be a huge benefit to his practice. As I read the various posts, I couldn't help mentally c/c'ing my own experience demonstrating (informally) my Asus R2H to some hospital professionals.

The testing of the physician order entry app was initiated because some of the healthcare professionals felt that the Motion LE1600 was too heavy, at 3.13 pounds. Though the R2H weighs in at 1.83 pounds (the same as Dr. Rubin's eo), it, too, was deemed too heavy. There's no denying the R2H is a bit brickish.

The hospital's software was designed for 1024 x 768 resolution. Vital order information was cut off at the native 800 x 480 resolution of the R2H. This problem did not exist when the R2H emulated 1024 x 600, though some scrolling was necessary. However, at any resolution, the response was that the caregivers, who average about 50 years in age, would find the 7-inch screen too difficult to read. I noticed that Dr. Rubin looks like he's seen a few decades, too; perhaps his EMR software is tailored to fit the smaller screen without resorting to tiny print.

In a fascinating development, I've heard that my correspondents are quite excited about the Motion C5, despite the fact that it weighs almost as much as an LE1600. When I asked about this, the explanation I got was that the benefits of having a device that is durable, sealed and can be wiped with disinfectant far outweighed any weight considerations. I hope to see these babies in action soon.


source: TabletGear.com

TabletGear.com's source: MedicalTabletPC.com



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2 comments:

Dr. Abusharr said...

Excellent considerations as I recall our residency's attempt to use PatientKeeper with Palm pdas some years ago. You can't do much with a 320x320 pixel display if you are trying to reproduce webpages or pages for 800x600 or larger. Using my Treo 650 (ditched the 700p) with modest use as a PDA but not as a medical device. No patient info on it and no desire to tap in details either. We need a survey to see which of the UMPCs have been most stable out there and have best usage. I cannot for one, afford to buy and try until the right one is found.

The Miniature Mage said...

Thank you for your comments! As much as I love my Pocket PC Phone, it cannot be my sole mobile device. I used to get a kick out of using the Terminal Services Client on my Dell Axim (emulating 600x480) to connect to my PCs to do work; our very necessary VPN implementation put an end that. Now we have a VPN client that I should be able to use, but I have little inclination, thanks to my tablet and UMPC. I think the next batch of UMPCs will deserve a look. Because of the built-in keyboard, I would find Asus' next offering irresistible, if not for the VIA.